Saline Solution Benefits, Side Effects, Uses, Reviews and Facts


In medicine, saline (also saline solution) is a sterile solution of sodium chloride (NaCl, more commonly known as salt) in water. The sterile solution is typically used for intravenous infusion, rinsing contact lenses, nasal irrigation, and often used to clean piercing wounds. Saline Solution is used for treating dry or irritated nasal passages caused by colds, allergies, low humidity, or overuse of decongestant nose spray. It works by rinsing and moisturizing the nostrils.


Saline Benefits and Uses


For medical uses, saline is often used to flush wounds and skin abrasions. Normal Saline will not burn or sting when applied.


Saline is also used in I.V. therapy, intravenously supplying extra water to a dehydrated patient or supplying the daily water and salt needs of a patient who is unable to take them by mouth. Because infusing a solution of low osmolality can cause problems, intravenous solutions with reduced saline concentrations typically have dextrose (glucose) added to maintain a safe osmolality while providing less sodium chloride. As the molecular weight (MW) of dextrose is greater, this has the same osmolality as normal saline despite having less.


The amount of normal saline infused depends largely on the needs of the patient (e.g. ongoing diarrhea or heart failure) but is typically between 1.5 and 3 litres a day for an adult.


Rinse eye drops are often distributed for free by needle-exchange programmes. Containing normal saline, they are small, sterile, and safe for intravenous use.


Saline is also often used for nasal washes to relieve some of the symptoms of the common cold. This need not be sterile, as the nose cavity is not sterile either. In this case "home-made" saline may be used: this is made by dissolving approximately half a teaspoonful of table salt into a glass of clean tap water. At least two deaths have been reported from using unboiled or otherwise unsterilized tap water for nasal irrigation.


Saline nasal spray has several advantages over steroid nasal sprays and over no treatment at all. Saline sprays can be used to moisturize dry sinus cavities, loosen nasal congestion, and remove debris or pollens from the nose. Water and salt or sodium comprise the spray. This treatment is less expensive than other options and can even be made at home. Pharmacists suggests purchasing an additive-free form of saline nasal spray to prevent any unwanted side effects such as a burning sensation during application.


Concentrations


Concentrations vary from low to normal to high. High concentrations are used rarely in medicine but frequently in molecular biology.


Normal salin is the most commonly used salin solution. Normal saline is the solution that hospitals give to patients through an IV drip who cannot take liquids by mouth or who are dehydrated. Normal saline is 0.9% NaCl (sodium chloride or salt). This means that for every 100 mL of water there is 0.9 grams of NaCl. This is equivalent to 9.0 grams per litre or 0.009 grams per millilitre.


Normal Saline for Wound Care


Normal saline is used for many medical purposes


Normal saline can be used to cleanse, irrigate, or moisturize wounds. It is also used in IV fluids for dehydration and in contact lens solutions.


Normal saline (0.9%) is a solution commonly used for medical purposes such as intravenous therapy for severe dehydration. It is also used as a rinse for contact lenses, and is used in wound care for irrigating, cleansing and hydrating wounds.


In simple wound care, normal saline can be used to cleanse a wound. It can be used in place of soap and water or other wound cleansers. It will not burn or otherwise irritate a wound. It is often used to cleanse deep wounds by irrigating or flushing out debris and dried blood.


Wounds need moisture in order to heal properly. If a wound is too dry it simply will not heal. In some instances, the normal saline is used in a wet-to-dry or damp-to-dry dressing to moisturize the wound. This is not a simple dressing change procedure and should only be used under the direction of a health care professional.


If soap and water is too painful or harsh to a simple wound, normal saline can be prepared at home and used to cleanse a wound. You can purchase a saline solution in the drug store, but to buy normal saline you will need a prescription. You may substitute a saline contact lens rinsing solution, but look for one that is thimerisol free. (Read the label it must be saline solution.) There are a few aerosol type saline wound cleansers available as well.


NOTE: It is important to use care to ensure that the solution is not contaminated. It contains no preservatives and must be discarded every week.


There are alternate ways to make your own normal saline


First, wash your hands.


Using a clean jar with a screw type lid, add 1/4 tsp. of non-iodized table salt to one cup of water. Loosely screw on the lid and place the jar into a sauce pan. Fill the sauce pan with enough water to cover 3/4 of the jar. Cover and boil for 25 minutes. Remove from the heat and allow the jar to cool. Tighten the lid. Refrigerate and keep it refrigerated.


Alternately you can boil a cup of water with 1/4 tsp. non-iodized table salt in a clean covered pan. Bring to a boil and boil for 5 minutes. Allow to cool (still covered.) Then pour into a clean jar. Refrigerate and keep refrigerated.


How to use your homemade solution


Always wash your hands before you begin your wound care.


Pour the amount of saline you will need for your wound care each time into a clean small glass bowl. You can warm it slightly in the microwave if needed, but not above luke warm. Then pour onto gauze pads as you use them or place a few pads into the bowl to soak. Wring out excess into a separate container.


Tips:

  • Discard the solution if contaminated, becomes cloudy, or after one week.

  • If your tap water is particularly hard, you should use bottled or distilled water.

  • A clean jar is one that has been recently washed in a dishwasher with very hot soapy water. Alternately, you can ensure a jar is clean by immersing it and the lid (not screwed on) in a pan of water and boiling it for 20 minutes in a covered pan. Allow to cool in the covered pan. Remove from the cooled water. Don't touch the inside of the jar or lid. Fill with the saline solution.

  • Don't use homemade saline solution with contact lenses.

  • Don't drink or otherwise consume this solution.


Notify your healthcare practitioner:


  • Notify your health care practitioner of any changes in the wound such as redness, hot spots, streaking, odor, increased pain, fever.

  • Always see your healthcare provider if a wound is deep; or caused by an animal bite or scratch, a rusty or exceptionally dirty or otherwise contaminated surface.


History


Saline was believed to have originated during the Indian Blue Cholera pandemic that swept across Europe in 1831. William Brooke O'Shaughnessy, a recent graduate of Edinburgh Medical School, proposed in an article to medical journal "The Lancet" to inject cholera patients with highly-oxygenated salts to treat the "universal stagnation of the venous system and rapid cessation of arterialisation of the blood" seen in severely dehydrated cholera patients. He found his treatment harmless in dogs, and his proposal was soon adopted by the physician Thomas Latta in treating cholera patients to beneficial effect. In the following decades, variations and alternatives to Latta's solution were tested and used in treating cholera patients. These solutions contained a range of concentrations of sodium, chloride, potassium, carbonate, phosphate, and hydroxide. The breakthrough in achieving physiological concentrations was accomplished by Ringer in 1831, when he determined the optimal salt concentrations to maintain the contractility of frog heart muscle tissue. Normal saline is considered a descendant of the pre-Ringer solutions, as Ringer's findings were not adopted and widely used until decades later. The term "normal saline" itself appears to have little historical basis, except for Hartog Jakob Hamburger's 1882–83 in vitro studies of red cell lysis that incorrectly suggested that 0.9% was the concentration of salt in human blood (rather than 0.6%, the true concentration).


Saline Side Effects


Since salin is a salt solution, it will have the same side effects of excess salt intake. Symptoms of increased salt intake include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. High concentrations of sodium in the body can also result from excessive water or fluid loss. Persistently high levels of sodium in the blood can result in swelling, high blood pressure, difficulty in breathing, and heart failure, and may be fatal.


Please note - some side effects for Saline may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.


Saline Bacteriostatic

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. When used in small doses, no COMMON side effects have been reported with Saline Bacteriostatic. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Saline Bacteriostatic:


  • Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); redness or swelling at the injection site.


This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.


Saline Gel

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. No COMMON side effects have been reported with the proper use of Saline Gel. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Saline Gel:


  • Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue).


This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.


Saline Solution

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. No COMMON side effects have been reported with the proper use of Saline Solution. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Saline Solution:


  • Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue).


This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.


Salinex Spray

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. No COMMON side effects have been reported with the proper use of Salinex Spray. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Salinex Spray:


  • Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue).


This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.


Saline Spray

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. No COMMON side effects have been reported with the proper use of Saline Spray. Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Saline Spray:


  • Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue).


This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.


Saline Reviews


The following reviews have been selected:


------------------------------------------


13 of 13 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars great product, August 6, 2008
By
Book reviewer 2005
This is a great product. I use it for my baby to help keep her nasal passages moist through the night. She was waking up at night because of trouble breathing related to boogers. This has really helped her. I use it in the morning and evening. Much more frequently when she has a cold. She doesnt mind it too bad.


------------------------------------------


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars Eye care for you and your dog at a great price, March 20, 2011
By
Ivanka
My veterinarian was using it on his dog's eyes and suggested this saline solution as the safest way to clean corners of my dog's eyes where tear discharge accummulates and dries up. I used to wipe it with water only and it would make the discharge worse and his eyes red. I love it because I can now safely clean the discharge with a piece of cotton soaked fully with this solution. My chihuahuas' eye discharge have decreased and his eyes are no longer red. Most importantly, because the solution is exactly the same as natural tears, it does not hurt the eyes at all when cleaning.


------------------------------------------


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars ...THE BEST!, February 28, 2011
By
Mary Beth "books 'n roses" (Texas)
I started using [this] when I began wearing a special kind of "contact" lens developed by the Boston Foundation for Sight. The lens are really a unique prosthetic device which is filled with substitute "tears" (since I don't make any of my own). This allows my eyes to stay moist and the lens to "ride" on a surface of tears instead of sitting on the damaged cornea's surface. [It] is also used in conjunction with other products in cleaning the lens for the night and again in the morning preparing the lens to be worn. It's a very valuable product for me and many hundreds of cornea-damaged patients who wear these special lens! The patients are recommended to use [it] and I've successfully used it for going on 4 years now...


------------------------------------------


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars AWESOME!!, April 6, 2010
By
M. Thomas (APO, AP)
A girlfriend gave me a few bottles of this saline solution for my baby shower. I had never heard of it, but she [promised] by it! It's natural(BIG PLUS) and loosens all the gunk inside baby's nose (adults too)!

Makes using the nose sucker much easier and my baby HAS NEVER FUSSED ONCE. Though I also make it look fun- I pretend to use it, smile/giggle and then I use it on her before she goes to bed and she breathes easily at night.

This really is a fabulous product! Try it! Not only will you not be disappointed, but you will be giving it out at the next baby shower you attend!


------------------------------------------


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Contact Lens Saline, August 21, 2011
By
DP Colorado
I have never found a saline solution for contact wearers that is more comfortable. This also makes for a good eye wash if needed. I am glad to see the TSA symbol on each of the bottles so I can take this on airplanes with my Carry-On liquids even though the volume of the bottles exceeds the 100 ml maximum allowed. I have never had any TSA screener raise a question.


------------------------------------------


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars Gets the boogs out and soothes the little one, July 20, 2010
By
Marc B. Walker "Marc Walker" (Austin, TX USA)
One of the many things you'll find out as a new parent is it doesn;t take much to upset your baby. My little guy, 6 weeks old, gets stuffed up. It could be allergies (we live in Austin the allergen capital of the world) or could be his little system just adjusting to being outside the womb. Eitherway he has boggies and it upsets him something awful.
We had recieved this as a present and forgot about it. After a day or so of Finn fussing and breathing hard we remebered it and tried it - instant success! A few drops in and within 2 minutes he was sneezing it out - a little nasal sucker to the nostril and he was all better. In fact he was happy and all fussing stopped!


------------------------------------------


Learn More About Salt

Learn More About Rock Salt

Learn More About Sea Salt

Learn More About Salt and Pepper


www.todosjesus.info
Free DVDs, Articles & Books
FREE DVDs & VIDEOS
WATCH & DOWNLOAD ALL OUR DVDs & VIDEOS FOR FREE!